Security & Mobility Now
Security is top-of-mind everywhere, especially right here where Juniper experts share their thoughts on the latest security breakthroughs and product advancements
danielvhoffman

Exposing Your Personal Information – There’s An App for That

by Juniper Employee on ‎10-30-2012 02:54 PM

Mobile devices and applications are no longer an accessory – they’re central to our daily lives. Gartner predicts the number of mobile apps downloaded will double to 45 billion this year – and they’re only getting smarter. Today’s apps are increasingly essential to accessing critical business applications, connecting with friends on the go and even adopting digital wallets.  

 

While these apps make our lives easier, they also give a wider group of application developers and advertising networks the ability to collect information about our activities and leverage the functionality of our devices. At the same time, the companies, consumers and government employees who install these apps often do not understand with who and how they are sharing personal information. Even though a list of permissions is presented when installing an app, most people don’t understand what they are agreeing to or have the proper information needed to make educated decisions about which apps to trust. 

 

More concerning is that many apps collect information or require permissions unnecessary for the described functionality of the apps. This is not the first time this issue has surfaced – reports of popular apps collecting irrelevant information or transmitting data when devices are turned off has led to significant backlash. However, less is known about the state of privacy across the entire application ecosystem. 

 

To get a sense of the state of application privacy today, Juniper Networks’ Mobile Threat Center (MTC) analyzed over 1.7 million apps on the Google Play market from March 2011 to September 2012.

 

Topline Findings

 

We found a significant number of applications contain permissions and capabilities that could expose sensitive data or access device functionality that they might not need. We also determined these apps had permission to access the Internet, which could provide a means for exposed data to be transmitted from the device. Of particular interest, free applications were much more likely to access personal information than paid applications. Specifically, free apps are 401 percent more likely to track location and 314 percent more likely to access user address books than their paid counterparts. MTC Final Graphic - high-res.jpg

 

  • 24.14 percent of free apps have permission to track user location, while only 6.01 percent of paid apps have this ability;
  • 6.72 percent of free apps have permission to access user address books, while 2.14 percent  of paid apps do;
  • 2.64 percent of free apps have permission to silently send text messages, whereas 1.45 percent of paid apps can;
  • 6.39 percent of free apps have permission to clandestinely initiate calls in the background, while only 1.88 percent of paid apps do; and
  • 5.53 percent of free apps have permission to access the device camera, whereas only 2.11 percent of paid apps have this access.

 

Advertising Tracking

 

When looking at the disparity between free versus paid apps, there is a common industry assumption that free apps collect information in order to serve ads from third-party ad networks. While this is true in some cases, Juniper examined 683,238 application manifests and found the percentage of apps with the top five ad networks is much less than the total number tracking location (24.14 percent).

 

  • 0.75 percent of apps feature AdMob ads;
  • 4.10 percent of apps feature ads from the AirPush network;
  • 1.51 percent of apps include Millennial Media ads;
  • 0.32 percent of apps include ads from AdWhirl; and
  • 2.34 percent of apps feature ads from the Leadbolt ad network.

 

This leads us to believe there are several apps collecting information for reasons less apparent than advertising.

 

Potential for Misuse of Permissions

 

Possibly more concerning are the other permissions being requested from applications like the ability to clandestinely initiate outgoing calls, send SMS messages and use a device camera. An application that can clandestinely initiate a phone call could be used to silently listen to ambient conversations within hearing distance of a mobile device. Similarly, access to the device camera could enable a third party to obtain video and pictures of the area where the device is present, as was recently presented with the proof-of-concept Spyware PlaceRaider.

 

Silently sending SMS messages can also be a means to create a covert channel for siphoning sensitive information from a device. Further, the potential for stealth SMS messages or calls can have monetary repercussions by communicating with services that will subsequently charge a fee, such as calling a 1-900 in the U.S. or sending premium SMS messages.  

 

Apps Categories of Most Concern

 

The Juniper MTC also looked at different categories of applications and found some that seemed to be comparatively overstepping the needs of the applications when accessing certain permissions. For these apps, we cross-referenced the permissions requested with the functionality in the description of the apps. Our analysis noted apps that had the ability to do well more than a user could know and collect information not documented as necessary for the app to perform its intended use.

 

Cards & Casino

 

Cards and Casino games include applications focused on imitating popular casino games for fun. In this category:

 

  • 94 percent of free apps in this category that have permission to make outbound calls do not describe why the apps would justifiably use this capability;
  • 83.88 percent of free apps that have permission to use the camera do so without any description of how the camera is being used by the apps; and
  • 84.51 percent of free apps that have permission to send SMS messages do so without any description of why the applications would need to send SMS messages.

 

Racing Games

 

Racing Games are by far the most concerning category with an abnormally high number of apps removed from the marketplace over the time period of our analysis. Applications can be removed for a variety of reasons, including Google doing so for concerns over malware, questionable developers temporarily placing apps to phish for data, or for legitimate reasons, whereby an application is simply no longer being offered by a developer. During the manual portion of the research, this category contained the highest number of applications that the MTC would consider to be newly discovered malware.

 

  • 99 percent of paid apps and 92.42 percent of free apps in this category have permission to send SMS messages and did not provide an explanation of why this capability would be necessary in the game;
  • 50 percent of free apps that have permission to use the camera do so without any description of how or why this capability is being used; and
  • 94.54 percent of free apps with the ability of initiating outgoing calls did so without providing any description or justification for why this capability is necessary.

 

Upon Further Review

 

Our research also led to some unexpected insights as to the legitimate use of permissions. We examined cases where permissions or data collection was justified even though the reasons were not immediately   obvious. We did this by installing apps to fully understand their functionality, as well as contacting several developers.

 

  • There were a number of Cards and Casino apps from a specific developer that had the ability to use the device camera functionality. In reading the app descriptions and installing the application, there did not appear to be any reason for this capability. We contacted the developer who explained that with the premium version of the app, an icon would appear in the Tool Bar to enable the user to take a picture to use as a background for the game. This is a legitimate logical use that was not clearly communicated upfront for a consumer to understand or appreciate.

 

  • During our initial analysis of outgoing call permissions, it seemed concerning that 12.51 percent of free Finance apps had the ability to initiate a phone call without going through the dialer interface and that 63.19 percent didn’t provide a description of this capability within the app.  However, after installing a number of these applications, it became clear that this capability was legitimately used by users to contact local financial institutions.

 

Conclusions

 

The MTC’s analysis of the Google Play market shows the pervasiveness of mobile tracking and where apps could do a better job of disclosing why they need information up front and highlight functionality as a genuine user benefit. Our hope is that this research can give a better understanding of the current state of application privacy and provide insight to ensure the best actionable information is available to understand the effects on user privacy and the protection of enterprise data. We have several suggestions that the industry should consider:

 

  • Correlate permissions to actual app functionality. Simply saying an app has the permission to track location, read contacts or silently perform an outgoing call doesn’t provide the necessary context of why this functionality is necessary for a specific app. Providing a means to  communicate how permissions align with how the app works would help address this item.

 

  • Better differentiate between permissions. There is a big difference between a Spyware app clandestinely placing an outgoing call to listen to ambient conversations within hearing distance of the device, and a financial app that provides the convenience of calling local branches from within an application. The manner in which permissions are currently presented does not provide a means for users to differentiate between the two. More needs to be done to provide developers with differentiated permissions and to perform these very different actions.

 

  • Accept some exposure with free apps. It seems there is no such thing as a free lunch in mobile. If people choose to use free applications, they will likely need to provide information in exchange. Often times, the value provided by the app is well worth the information given up by a user; however, many do not realize that this tracking is happening and may not be making informed choices. Communicating why information is needed in a concise and easy-to-understand means could help people become more comfortable with information sharing.

 

  • A smaller amount of actionable data is beneficial.  Helping people understand what is actually occurring on their device and with their data has considerably more value than a list of permissions. More educated users means they are more comfortable installing apps and less likely to uninstall once they see the number of permissions being requested without explanation.

 

Methodology

 

The research contained in this report was conducted on the Google Play market. Apple does not disclose related information about its apps, and questions regarding the Apple App Store and related privacy statistics should be directed towards Apple.

 

This research was conducted via four primary means:

 

  • Statistical analysis of application meta-data to determine permissions being requested by paid and free apps in various application categories;

 

  • Analysis of application descriptions to determine if the reasoning behind permission usage is being explained and justified by application features and functionality;

 

  • Statistical analysis of application manifests to correlate permissions being requested to AdNet usage; and

 

  • Manual installation and research of applications to further explore key findings and to verify study methodology.

 

Comments
by Privacy Researcher(anon) on ‎11-03-2012 10:41 AM

"free applications were much more likely to access personal information than paid applications"

This is a highly interesting finding in the supply-side economics of privacy. It seems confirmed that users either pay with money or with their personal data. The trade-off between good privacy and good price is not universal though: in electronic retailing, sellers that collect less data charge lower prices, with high significance.

by Henry_P(anon) on ‎11-03-2012 03:34 PM

And the solution, other than uninstalling all free apps?

by dudewithoutajob(anon) on ‎11-04-2012 04:14 AM

The solution is to strengthen legislation to prevent this abuse, and potential threat to security.

 

Of course, those who benefit from the information should not be the gatekeepers alone, nor should it be left to states (in the US) to create variations and loopholes in this effort.  

 

I could tell you more but that will cost you. 

by Christian Karayannides(anon) on ‎12-04-2012 11:40 AM

Hi Daniel,

 

Love the article, great research points that put the numbers behind what many of us already suspected. Have some great info for you for a follow-up article that provides an interesting solution to this problem. How is best to get in touch? 

 

I am with RLMpr in NYC.

 

Regards,

 

Christian

by WoefulMinion(anon) on ‎08-04-2013 05:51 PM

It's not just apps. I wanted to comment on a newspaper website and it wouldn't accept that I was already signed in as a subscriber. I had to choose a service to authenticate and all required access to all my contacts, messages and profile. The Twitter even wanted permission to post messages for me.

Needless to say, I can't voice my opinion because I'm unwilling to turn over my life for a comment.

Post a Comment
Be sure to enter a unique name. You can't reuse a name that's already in use.
Be sure to enter a unique email address. You can't reuse an email address that's already in use.
Type the characters you see in the picture above.Type the words you hear.
Labels
About the Author
  • Title: Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Branch Solutions Business Unit Area of Responsibility: Driving Juniper business including strategy, revenue/profitability, products and execution for this segment of SLT's overall portfolio, specifically comprehensive solutions for the small to medium size locations of large, distributed enterprises. Alex joined Juniper in February 2008 after more than five years at Extreme Networks, where he served as Chief Operating Officer from mid 2002 through 2006, and the last year as VP and GM of Extreme's high-end switching business and core engineering operations. During his tenure at Extreme Alex led programs which established essential product lifecycle and quality systems, completely refreshed the product portfolio, significantly improved product and service quality and margins, and streamlined the supply chain. Prior to Extreme Alex served as Chief Operating Officer for LCG Wireless (acquired by ADC Telecommunications), SVP Business Operations for ReplayTV, and earlier spent eight years in various executive roles with Octel Communications (acquired by Lucent Technologies) as CIO, SVP Business Operations, and SVP and GM of Enterprise Messaging. Alex holds a bachelors and masters degree in electrical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis.
  • I am a geek who loves knowing how everything works. I spent 13+ years as a software engineer and then transitioned to technical marketing. Not only do I need to know the geeky bits, but now I get to know about the business side - the MBA comes in handy. I enjoy sharing Juniper's message with customers and educating folks about our great solutions. When I'm not busy working I enjoy spending time with my wife and two kids. We all enjoy being outdoors. Huge soccer fan. Crazy Chicago Bears fan!
  • I manage the SRX3K and 1K line of security service gateways. I have spent a decade working with networking devices and in the process have obtained the JNCIE certification.
  • Passionate about the Internet and the connectedness of all things. I came from a background in ISPs and telecoms networks. I pride myself in being able to design a service, not just a config, and planning for scalable operations. Monitoring and network management a speciality. In my spare time I'll probably be messing about with a map or GPS or looking for a country pub, often all at the same time.
  • In my role as a WW Technical Field Strategist, I am part of a small team working to help reduce the friction associated with the technical side of doing business with Juniper.
  • Bill is the Director of Federal Strategic Initiatives at Juniper Networks. In this role, Bill focuses on several areas unique to the needs of Federal Government customers, including product certifications, IPv6, and security. Bill came to Juniper Networks in January 2008 after more than 20 years in the IT community working with commercial enterprise customers, service providers, and the US Federal Government. Bill started his career as an engineering officer in the US Air Force after graduating with a Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Bill has an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • I'm a Security Product Line Engineer and Security Researcher at Juniper Networks working with the High End (Data Center) SRX and ScreenOS platforms, along with the IDP Standalone appliances. Prior to joining Juniper Networks, I was a senior consultant with a network security consulting firm, working extensively with Juniper products, including design, implementation, managed services, and support. I'm a co-author of Junos Security, Configuring NetScreen/SSG Firewalls, and Configuring Juniper SSL VPN's. I have a deep interest in network security, especially around Malware and IPS, and DDoS.
  • Security strategist, architect, evangelist/prophet, former-CISO, brick layer, priest and short order cook…product manager, product marketeer, CTO, advisor, board member and SQUIRREL! My life? It’s like Blade Runner meets Beautiful Mind w/some Patrick Swayze Roadhouse violence mixed in
  • Darrell Hyde began his career in the managed hosting industry in 1997, joining HOSTING's management team in 2003. During his tenure Darrell has led HOSTING'S Network Operations and Network Engineering teams and has played a lead role in the organization's technical direction. As Vice President of Architecture, Darrell is tasked with leading service design for HOSTING's product portfolio and overseeing the organization's technology strategy. In his spare time, Darrell lives in Philadelphia with his wife and 2 cats and really hopes Chip Kelly can restore the Eagles to glory.
  • Deena Thomchick has spent over 20 years in technology with most of it focused on networking and security. She’s currently responsible for product marketing for Juniper Network’s next generation firewalls and security gateway products where she spends her time learning how organizations use firewalls to protect themselves. Her security focus prior to Juniper Networks includes seven years with Symantec and VeriSign working on anti-virus and SSL technologies respectively.
  • Erin O’Malley is a senior marketing manager for global branding at Juniper Networks. Her team's goal is to amplify the company's brand promise: "Your ideas. Connected." A promise that speaks to the importance of innovation and sharing of personal insights. Previously at Juniper, Erin managed social media for Juniper's security business unit and was a product marketing manager for the company's virtualization and cloud security solutions. She has also worked on the customer marketing team at VMware and as a marketing writer at various companies, including WSGR, Business Objects, and the TDA Group. Erin holds a B.A. in French from Penn State University and an M.A. in French from Middlebury College.
  • François Prowse is a Senior Systems Engineer for Juniper Networks, based in Brisbane Australia. Francois joined Juniper in 2006 as part of the New Zealand SE team, subsequently relocating to Australia. Prior to Juniper, Francois worked for four years at Alcatel in both operational and architectural roles, being jointly responsible for the construction of New Zealands' largest MPLS core network. Prior to Alcatel, Francois worked at UUnet, focusing on core network expansion in Europe. In all previous roles JUNOS has been the driving factor behind day to day operations, providing him with over 8 years of operational experience. Francois is a Juniper Networks Certified Internet Expert (JNCIE #144) which he obtained prior to joining Juniper Networks.
  • As a Strategy & Planning Architect at Juniper Networks, my main interest and focus is mobile space security. It is through that interest that I am participating in 3GPP standards. My background is quite versatile, ranging from field Systems Engineer, to Education Services and Customer Services Engineer, to Product Line Engineer. Many moons ago, I attained both CCIE and JNCIE. I advocate change and enjoy challenges. I have a PhD degree in Organization & Management, specializing in IT. My Master's degree is in Computer Science from the University of Toronto.
  • ISP Network Engineer currently enjoying the security side of the Juniper product range. Busy studying for the JNCIP-SP and ENT. Outside of work I enjoy the great outdoors: Mountaineering, Bouldering, Rock or Ice climbing, Tramping (hiking to non-Kiwis) and Snowboarding. I'm also a member of the Alpine Cliff Rescue Team in Christchurch, assisting is vertical rescues or those requiring specialist access or extraction techniques, crevasse rescue etc.
  • Greg Sidebottom is a Senior Engineering Manager in the Identity and Policy Management business unit at Juniper Networks. Greg has spent the last decade plus conceptualizing, architecting, designing, and leading the implementation of Juniper's SDX and SRC families of policy based service management applications. Previous to this, Greg held positions in the software and networking industries at Siemens, Cognos, Nortel, GTE labs subsidiary MPR Teltech, and the Alberta Research Council. Greg is an author of eight invention disclosures resulting in two patents issued and three pending. Greg holds a B.Sc. in Computer Science for the University of Calgary and an M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Computing Science from Simon Fraser University.
  • IT Professional, Space nut, News junky, Interested in the world, based in the SF Bay area
  • Jim Kelly, Senior Product Line Manager – CTP Products Juniper Networks. Jim Kelly is the senior product line manager for the CTP products where he is responsible for the CTP product direction, marketing and circuit emulation applications within Juniper Networks. Mr. Kelly has more than 28 years of experience in the networking industry in technical roles, sales, marketing, and product management positions. He started his career in the United States Air Force. He has worked for Wang, Digital Telecom Systems, American Airlines, Network Equipment Technologies, Carrier Access, and Nortel Networks. He started Juniper Networks federal DoD sales in July 2000 and joined Juniper Networks again in October 2005 through the acquisition of Acorn Packet Solutions where he was the director of sales and marketing.
  • John is an experienced IT professional with over 25 years in the Industry. He is the UKI security lead for Juniper Networks and previous to this has held various sales in sales management positions with Mimecast, Proofpoint, Cisco, EMC and PCS. He started his career with Siemens and Sun Microsystems as a Systems Engineer.
  • Kevin manages Juniper's Counter Security portfolio, delivering innovative solutions to better address the advanced threats targeting organizations today. Counter Security builds on Juniper's network security capabilities, focusing on providing protection for Web applications with technologies like Intrusion Deception and application DDoS protection; as well as identifying and mitigating internal Advanced Persistent Threats attempting to exfiltrate data. Security Intelligence—applying big data analytics techniques to identify the sources of threats, and propagating the information to enforcement points in real-time—spans the Counter Security portfolio. Prior to Juniper, Kevin managed the Content Security portfolio at Cisco, including IronPort Email and Web Security, and ScanSafe Cloud Web Security. Before joining IronPort and Cisco, he ran product management and marketing for Infotone Communications, an integration appliance start-up and managed a seed-stage technology investment fund. Kennedy started his career at Intel, where his responsibilities spanned from microprocessor design to marketing to sales to venture investment. Kennedy has a BSE Computer Engineering from the University of Michigan.
  • Kyle Adams is one of the lead developers for the Mykonos Web Security solution acquired by juniper networks in early 2012. With over 10 years of experience in web security and application development, Kyle helps identify and implement innovative security techniques to help combat the ever increasing wave of cyber-attacks. He studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and holds a BS in Computer Science and a minor in Criminal Justice.
  • I'm a Network Security Engineer working with Vodafone in their Cloud and Hosting Services team based in Leeds, UK. My role is to implement, test and deliver secure cloud based solutions to external customers.
  • 20 years technology experience in sales, product management and marketing. 15 in security. Living the good guys versus bad guys fight every day.
  • Michel Tepper is a Juniper consultant and instructor working for Westcon Security in the Netherlands. He started working in ICT in 1987. Michel is also is a Juniper Ambassador. Currently he holds three Junos Professional certifications and a number of specialist and associate certifications on non-Junos tracks. Michel is an active member of J-Net and juniperforum.com, where he uses the nickname screenie referring to the ScreenOS with which he started his Juniper Journey.
  • 30 Years in Book Publishing, 20 years in Technical Book Publishing, including Apple Developer Press, Adobe Press, Nokia Developer Books, Palm Books, and since 2001, almost 10 years as consulting editor/editor in chief for Juniper Networks Book. Joined the company and started the Day One book line and in 2011, the new This Week book line.
  • I work at Poplar Systems - Juniper Authorized Education Partner, Russia. We teach official Juniper classes on Juniper routing, switching and security products since 2006. In 2012 and 2013 we received Gold Awards as a Juniper education partner of the year in EMEA region. Poplar employees are Juniper fans who are exclusively devoted to providing as-high-as-possible quality Juniper education. One aspect of this is the fact that currently all our instructors are at least 2xJNCIE certified.
  • Rajoo Nagar is a senior manager in product marketing at Juniper Networks. She is responsible for product marketing for Juniper's security solutions. Rajoo is a published author, her book “Telecom Service Rollouts” was published by McGraw Hill Professional.
  • Sr. director for security portfolio marketing @ Juniper. I've been in IT management and security for many moons, focused on product marketing and communications. Fascinated with internet culture and evolution, watching how it moves the markets and opens our minds.
  • Rob Cameron is the Director of Product Line Engineering for Juniper Networks' data center firewall product line. Rob and his team currently support the largest designs and architectures for the SRX Series data center product lines. In his six years at Juniper he has supported major accounts in the Midwest region of the US, worked on data center strategy, and supported the SRX Series data center firewall product line since launch. Prior to his work at Juniper, he worked at several consulting organizations focusing on network security and high-availability architectures. Rob has five published books on using security technology. This includes his recently released "Junos Security" book from O'Reilly media.
  • I'm a Product Line Manager in the Security Business Unit working on all things intrusion prevention-related. I've been in the security field since 1994 working on diverse projects such as developing HP's public-key infrastructure (PKI), building the first protocol anomaly-based IDS at Recourse Technologies (acquired by Symantec), integrating vulnerability management and IDS at VM vendor nCircle and managing IPS products at Cisco and Juniper.
  • Digital Marketing Manager at Juniper Networks APAC.
  • Jonathan Looney is a Senior Staff Courseware Developer at Juniper Networks. Before joining Juniper, he performed network engineering for a large enterprise, a regional ISP, and an application service provider (ASP). The holder of several industry certifications, he enjoys the freedom his job at Juniper gives him to both continually learn and also to share his knowledge with others through a wide range of media.
  • Scott is the Director of Product Marketing for Mobile Security at Juniper Networks. In his 20+ years in high tech, Scott has worked on Mobile and Endpoint Security, Network Security, IPS, Managed Services, Network Infrastructure, Co-location, Microprocessor Architecture, Unix Servers and Network Adapters. He has held leadership roles at Check Point, McAfee, Symantec, Exodus Communications, Cable & Wireless, Savvis, and HP.
  • Networking & Security nerd (geek overall), Hockey fanatic, and Junos junkie! Born and raised in Grand Rapids, MI, with a few years of my life out in MN. Been in the IT field since I got out of High School. I've used Juniper products since around 2007, and really enjoy working with them. I currently work for a large retailer based in MI, with a footprint all across the Midwest.
  • Seema is a Sr. Product Marketing Manager of Security products. With over 10 years of experience in the network security field, she has been focused on sales enablement, product marketing and competitive intelligence at Check Point Software, Imperva, Webroot Software and Juniper Networks. Seema holds a B.S. in Computer Engineering from San Jose State University, California. Outside work, she loves to keep up with tech news, travel with family, listen to East Indian music (Bollywood, classical, and hip hop, depending on the mood) and attend concerts.
  • Timothy LeMaster is Director of Systems Engineering at Juniper Networks, where he is responsible for driving product development efforts to meet the demands of U.S. federal customers and for overseeing the activities of Juniper’s federal business unit systems engineers. A government IT industry veteran, Tim leverages his more than 15 years of experience in telecommunications and networking for the benefit of Juniper’s federal customers. Prior to Juniper, Tim spearheaded the development of applications aiding the government in the management of a very large SONET/IP network for IT solutions provider Veridian. Tim has also held several positions in the government, ranging from network operations and network modeling to engineering. Tim is a former U.S. Air Force officer.
About Security & Mobility Now

Discussing a wide range of topics impacting enterprises and
data center security.

Subscribe RSS Icon

Our Bloggers

Kyle Adams
Senior Software Engineer

Profile | Subscribe

Ritesh Agrawal
Director
Software Engineering

Profile | Subscribe

Erin K. Banks
Senior Technical Marketing Manager

Profile | Subscribe

Ajay Bharadwaj
Product Manager

Profile | Subscribe

Michael Callahan
Vice President
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Scott Emo
Director
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Mora Gozani
Senior Manager
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Ashur Kanoon
Sr. Manager
Technical Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Seema Kathuria
Manager
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Kevin Kennedy
Senior Director
Product Management

Profile | Subscribe

Dave Killion
Software Engineer

Profile | Subscribe

Rebecca Lawson
Senior Director
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Rajoo Nagar
Senior Manager
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Erin O'Malley
Manager
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Galina Pildush
Strategy & Planning
Architect

Profile | Subscribe

Edward Roberts
Director
Product Marketing

Profile | Subscribe

Bill Shelton
Director Field Sales

Profile | Subscribe

Ashutosh Thakur
Product Line Manager

Profile | Subscribe

Troy Vennon
Software Engineer

Profile | Subscribe

Brad Woodberg
Product Manager

Profile | Subscribe

Copyright© 1999-2013 Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved.