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The Security Focus on Android: Fair or Unfair?

by Juniper Employee on ‎02-14-2012 01:52 PM

When looking across the many recent mobile security discussions, much of the attention focuses on threats posed by malware on Google’s Android platform, which has quickly risen to become the most popular operating system. Some would say this is because Android is an inherently less secure platform when compared to other mobile operating systems and that the openness of the Android Market can easily lead to exploitation. Others would simply state it is because Android has more market share leading to more attention by industry and attackers. Regardless of these differing opinions, looking at Android security in more detail is certainly worthy of discussion. 

 

Any examination of mobile security should holistically look at all of the threats to mobile devices and the means to address them. Regardless if the device is an Android smartphone, Apple iPad, or from other platform, the threats remain the same:

 

  • Malware – Spyware, Trojans, Worms, Viruses
  • Direct Attack – Browser-based exploits, attacking device interfaces, malicious SMS messages
  • Data Communication Interception – Intercepting Data transmitted over Wi-Fi or other transport methods
  • Loss and Theft – Devices left in taxis or actively stolen to obtain the device and its data
  • Exploitation and Misconduct. – Employees leaking information, children behaving inappropriately or being maliciously targeted via cyber bullying or online predators

 

In the majority of these threat categories, it could be reasonably concluded that there is a good deal of parity between Android, iOS and other platforms. Specifically, both Android and iOS have had documented instances of successful direct attacks, are susceptible to the same Wi-Fi interception attacks and can be easily lost or stolen. 

 

In regards to exploitation and misconduct, Android could be seen as more secure, because there are solutions available today that allow parents and companies to monitor their children and employees in great detail to prevent unapproved activity. Examples include the ability for a supervising authority to view the content of SMS messages, phone call logs, as well as pictures taken, sent and received by devices issued by or connecting to corporate networks. Conversely, granular insightful parental or corporate control features into actual device usage are not able to be developed on iOS devices due to development restrictions for that platform.

 

This leads to, of course, the focus on malware, which errantly garners the most attention when most people think about mobile security. Many have said in the past that Apple devices are more secure because of Apple’s sandboxing of applications and the analysis of applications being posted in the Apple App store. Related, many have also argued that Android’s open platform and open Android Market make that platform comparatively less secure.

 

Google’s recent announcement that they do scan the Android Market should be taken into consideration on the last point. It will certainly help reduce infection rates from downloads on the official market of known threats. However, this mitigation does nothing for the millions of applications that are downloaded from the Web and third-party app stores.  Further, the standard which Google considers an application malicious will prove to be fairly narrow when compared to what many security companies, enterprises and consumers, who do not have an allegiance with the developers providing applications to the Market, want to protect themselves against.

 

There are several other aspects of Android’s approach to security that help keep users safe and are differentiated from Apple.  Let’s start by realizing that free market competition leads to better security products and services to protect consumer and enterprise data.  This is especially true with malware protection, because companies are constantly trying to make their solution better than the competition, with more in-depth analysis, complex detection technologies, increased speed in detecting threats and other innovations to stop attackers.

 

The result and benefit of this competition is very clearly seen through the plethora of easily available choices for Android anti-malware protection.  Enterprises and consumers can take their pick of many different anti-malware solutions to best fit their needs.  On the other hand, enterprises and consumers using Apple devices are not afforded the free choice of security solutions to protect their devices.  Apple device security is handled exclusively and secretly by Apple, with no insight on malicious application statistics and detection capabilities made available to the public.  This forces consumers and enterprises to put their blind trust and all of their security “apples” in one basket, so to speak.

 

If the threats to each kind of mobile device are similar and each device platform has its security strengths and weaknesses, why is much of the security focus on Android?  The answer comes down to market share and the availability of security data.  Hackers are incented to target Android, because there are simply more Android devices as compared to the competition. Additionally, there are security statistics readily and publicly available from numerous security vendors and researchers on the security concerns related to Android. Conversely, there is little known about Apple malware statistics and a complete lack of meaningful anti-malware security solutions for the iOS platform due to development restrictions.  If there aren’t statistics or products, there isn’t much to talk about, except for the absence of data.

 

So, is the security focus on Android fair?  It would be reasonable to say yes, as Android has the largest market share and any company in a leadership position should expect a level of scrutiny.  As to whether Android is comparatively less secure is fair, that is completely subjective. Is a platform with documented security exploits and a free and competitive market of solutions to address the risks deserving of more security scrutiny than a closed platform also with documented exploits whose security is completely and secretly controlled by the device’s manufacturer? 

 

That is an intriguing question. What we do know is that cyber-criminals and other attacks will continue to come up with new ways to attack mobile devices and the data that resides on them. To read our full report on mobile threats please visit www.Juniper.net/security.

 

 

 

 

 

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