Connecting the Cloud
Juniper Employee , Juniper Employee Juniper Employee
Connecting the Cloud
QFX10000: The Sky is the Limit
Apr 9, 2015

If you read my previous blog post, you know that the QFX10000 line of switches we introduced on March 11th are the most scalable, highest performing switches on the market.
 
As clouds become increasingly important to businesses and individuals, really there is no predicting how fast or how much your data center or cloud network will need to scale. That’s why we believe the QFX10000 line – with it’s industry leading capacity and ability to seamlessly transition from 10 and 40 GbE interfaces today to 100GbE and beyond in the future – is ideally suited to form the foundation of your cloud network.
 
For those of you who are more visually-oriented (or are just sick of reading my blogsSmiley Happy), the info graphic below that summarizes how the QFX10000 line will help make the sky the limit for your cloud or data center. Take a look and let us know what you think!

Juniper_Switching_Infographic_FINAL_0415.jpg.jpeg

Apr 21, 2015
jefftant

Brendan,

 

What do you mean by - "No vendor lock-in"?

Would QFX run on anything else than Junos?

 

Thanks,

Jeff

Apr 21, 2015
Juniper Employee

Jeff - what we mean is that the QFX Series - and Juniper products in general - don't lock you into a specific, proprietary architecture. For example, you can deploy QFX10000 as the aggregation layer in our Junos Fusion architecture, and that same QFX could also be aggregating third party switches deployed in a different fashion. This allows a seamless and evolutionary approach to introducing switches into a DC/cloud, and gives you more options in the future.

 

This is in contrast to what we have been hearing about some of our competitors.

 

Hope this helps to clarify.

 

Thanks,

Brendan

Apr 21, 2015
jefftant

Brendan,

 

Thanks for your responce!

 

Any and every DC today is built as a n-staged CLOS. What do you mean by - "proprietary architecture"

QFX is an ethernet switch, as much as Nexus, HP or Dell, with obvuous differences when it comes to features set and capacity.

How is it different when it comes to "no lock-in" strategy?

 

Thanks,

Jeff