Enterprise Cloud and Transformation
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Enterprise Cloud and Transformation
Forging DevOps Culture with Hedge-fund Flair
Oct 30, 2017

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People: your most important resource and your greatest predicament to DevOps potency.

 

When the DevOps consultants recess and you need to scale a pilot-project team’s savvy, how do you affect the wider organization with DevOps principles?

 

Balancing the ingredients of this so-called mentality is trickier than revamping tools and processes. We all know to let tooling lead thy process, and process lead thy tooling. We know the approach is a rolling upgrade, not a mass reboot.

 

But in the plethora chapter and verse on DevOps, cultural principles are still parsimonious—not another definition, nor “automate everything,” nor the trite dev and ops working closely—real principles of cultural behaviors, their reasoning and an implementation track record.

 

When I was pouring through the pages of Principles by the Steve Jobs of investing, Ray Dalio, I was expecting to learn about life, finance and business from this famed hedge-fund investment and business guru. I did. I also realized, Ray’s high-performing investment and management principles codify common aspects of the DevOps mentality with some new ideas and revisions. And he’s got the CEO and CIO track record to support it, only his c-level ‘I’ stands for investment.

 

In the spirit of the ‘S’ for sharing in DevOps’s CALMS, Ray has provided a principles manifesto in clear, practical terms. I won’t reveal them all—I encourage you to read the book for that—but here are five of his greatest principles, distilled and steeped with my own perspective for the DevOps anthology.

 

Listen to the podcast for all 5 parts straight away or use these links to navigate this series:

1.  Expedite Evolution, Not Perfection (and introduction)

2. Triangulate and Be Actively Open Minded

3. Radical Truth and Transparency

4. Be Candid and Fearless, Rather Than Blameless

5. Management by Machine and Metrics

 

 

 

1. Expedite Evolution, Not Perfection

From the opening biography, we come to know Ray as a continual learner by trial and error. He’s always looking for lessons in failures to carry forward, to do it better next time. He doesn’t regret failures; he values them more than successes because they provide learning.

 

Ray tells how he wouldn’t be where he is today—one of TIME’s top-100 most influential people in the world—if he had not hit rock bottom, having to let go of all his employees and forced to borrow $4000 from his dad to pay household bills until his family could sell their second car.

 

Because Ray upcycles painful mistakes into lessons and principles, learning and efficiency compound. He embraces evolutionary cycles, and knows a thing or two about compounding. Our human intelligence allows us to falter and adapt in rapid cycles that compound wisdom, without waiting for effects of generations. This iterative, rather than intellectual, approach performs better with the added benefit that, being experiential, you know it works.

 

If you’re a DevOps advocate, your Kaizen lightbulb may have lit. Kaizen is continuous learning: as I say, it’s the most important of all continuous practices in DevOps—and in life. Drawing from Ray’s rapid iteration of trial, error, reflect and learn, we see how he pairs Kaizen with Agile, values learning from failure, and takes many small quick steps for faster evolution.

 

To solidify the value behind this concept pairing, imagine a fixed savings interest rate, but change the cycle. What’s better: 12% annually or 1% monthly? “Periods do Matter” in this Investopedia article will show you that shorter cycles are better than longer ones. There is the technical reasoning behind why faster failing, leads to better evolution.

 

In another great read, 4 Seconds, Peter Bregman exemplifies how to manage learning and failure in business by telling the story of teaching his daughter to ride a bike without training wheels. Managing is knowing just the right time to step in and catch her. Too soon and she won’t learn to rebalance herself. Too late and...wipeout! He explains, “Learning to ride a bike, learning anything actually, isn't about doing it right: it's about doing it wrong and then adjusting. Learning isn't about being in balance, it's about recovering balance. And you can't recover balance if someone keeps you from losing balance in the first place.”

 

In summary, allow failure, cycle quickly and record the lessons. Depriving your people from the opportunity to fail, you deprive them from the opportunity to succeed—and the opportunity to improve. Breed a culture of rapid feedback and experimentation with guardrails, allowing failure without fatality.

 

Be the Change

 

Ray also says, “An organization is the opposite of a building: it's foundation is at the top.”

 

But we all know stories of change percolating from all levels of organizations, communities and countries. If you’re not a CEO like Ray was, you can still make a meaningful difference bottom-up or managing your own team, leading by example.

 

You could simply publish your team’s principles, create a tool, or ignite behaviors you want to spread. Of the DevOps people-process-technology, people are your most important resource; so forge the principles of their operating systems: sharpen, tweak, prioritize and balance. With the transformation door open in your digital business and DevOps journey, there’s no better time to make an invaluable mark on culture—in IT and beyond.

 

Listen to the podcast for all 5 parts straight away or use these links to navigate this series:

1.  Expedite Evolution, Not Perfection (and introduction)

2. Triangulate and Be Actively Open Minded

3. Radical Truth and Transparency

4. Be Candid and Fearless, Rather Than Blameless

5. Management by Machine and Metrics

 

image credit Jacob Lund/Shutterstock

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