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Juniper SRX 340 - no space left on /junos

[ Edited ]
‎02-10-2020 06:01 AM

Hello,

 

There is no space left on /junos partition, but everything works normal...

 

Filesystem                Size    Used   Avail Capacity  Mounted on
/dev/da0s2a               587M    318M    222M    59%    /
devfs                     1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /dev
/dev/md0                   20M     11M    6.6M    63%    /junos
/cf/packages              587M    318M    222M    59%    /junos/cf/packages
devfs                     1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /junos/cf/dev
/dev/md1                  1.1G    1.1G      0B   100%    /junos
/cf                        20M     11M    6.6M    63%    /junos/cf
devfs                     1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /junos/dev/
/cf/packages              587M    318M    222M    59%    /junos/cf/packages1
procfs                    4.0K    4.0K      0B   100%    /proc
/dev/bo0s3e               185M     40K    170M     0%    /config
/dev/bo0s3f               4.9G    525M    4.0G    11%    /cf/var
/dev/md2                  1.0G    398M    551M    42%    /mfs
/cf/var/jail              4.9G    525M    4.0G    11%    /jail/var
/cf/var/jails/rest-api    4.9G    525M    4.0G    11%    /web-api/var
/cf/var/log               4.9G    525M    4.0G    11%    /jail/var/log
devfs                     1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /jail/dev
/dev/md3                  1.8M    4.0K    1.7M     0%    /jail/mfs

 

Should I be worried because of that, or?

2 REPLIES 2
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Re: Juniper SRX 340 - no space left on /junos

‎02-10-2020 07:41 AM

Hello,

 

I can see the same on my SRX340:

 

/dev/md0 20M 11M 6.6M 63% /junos
/cf/packages 2.4G 315M 1.9G 14% /junos/cf/packages
devfs 1.0K 1.0K 0B 100% /junos/cf/dev
/dev/md1 1.0G 1.0G 0B 100% /junos
/cf 20M 11M 6.6M 63% /junos/cf
devfs 1.0K 1.0K 0B 100% /junos/dev/
/cf/packages 2.4G 315M 1.9G 14% /junos/cf/packages1

 

No issues here, seems normal.

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Re: Juniper SRX 340 - no space left on /junos

‎02-10-2020 04:59 PM

Hi Gabriel,

 

 

Greetings,  everything is working fine because your firewall is not running out of space as it might seem, there are some files that are meant to be that way ( at a 100%)  Please check below 

 

devfs:

In a Unix-style OS, processes access devices via /dev directory. Within this directory there are device nodes allocated as block or character devices, each with a major and minor number corresponding to its device driver and its device instance. (Eg. da0 and da0s1a)

For a new device such as a USB drive to be supported by kernel, there has to be a node in /dev corresponding to it so that processes are able to access it.

The virtual filesystem devfs, created by the kernel, keeps track of the device drivers currently registered while also automatically creating and removing the corresponding device nodes in /dev. The kernel will dynamically resize it so that it will always be as large as required for the device nodes, so df will show it as always being very small and 100% full. This is normal and harmless.

procfs:

The /proc file system (procfs) is a real-time API to the kernel. It is a virtual file system: it is not associated with a block device but exists only in memory. The files in the procfs are there to allow user programs not only access certain information from the kernel, but also for debug purposes.

Each process has its own directory under /proc with the process id as the name. In this directory we can find all kinds of information the kernel has for the particular process.

Since this /procfs will be made dynamically depending upon the process running and populate it with corresponding PID, it is as large as required at that moment and hence 100% utilized, which is normal and harmless.

In fact, ps uses the proc file system to obtain its information. We can get a more detailed view of the process by reading the file /proc/PID/status. Here is a snapshot of one such process:

 

Source: https://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/index?page=content&id=KB28319&cat=J_SERIES&actp=LIST

 

 


Regards,
Lil Dexx JNCIE-ENT#863

 

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