Technically Secure
Juniper Employee
Juniper Employee
‎11-03-2008 02:00 PM
‎11-03-2008 02:00 PM

In my last post we discussed a shift in the types of attack vectors that organizations have experienced and thus what results in a major security gap that organizations must come to terms with.  But this is not the only change that makes organizations more vulnerable to a potential security breach Regardless of an organization's charter, its greatest asset is its information. Whether it is a patented idea, customer data, or confidential roadmap, information is the single most important asset which determines if a company will prosper, eek by, or fade into oblivion. So if information is our greatest asset, why don't we better protect it?

 

When I go to on customer calls, one of the first things I do is open my laptop and do a networks scan. Most of the time, I can hop onto the network and gain full access without being challenged. I have full rights, full reign and the proverbial carte blanche to do as I wish. But don't think that this is an aberration. TJMaxx, UBS and Best Western all share the common bond and they are just a few organizations on a very long list of companies whose data has been stolen.

 

Hackers today can do more damage with a keyboard than a gun. Whether they sell confidential corporate information on the black market or commit identity theft, the motivation is financially based and can be highly lucrative.

 

Beyond soft targets, we also have sleeping sentries. A recent Verizon study noted that 63% of the organizations studied took MONTHS to find that a breach has occurred.  This is long after the damage has been done and is too late to mount a meaningful defense.

 

The motivation for hacking has evolved from breaking into websites to gain notoriety to a potential financial windfall for using or reselling confidential information. The sooner we mount the right defense to address this new reality, the better chance we have for ensuring that our organization is not on the front page of the Wall Street Journal for all the wrong reasons.